What to know about the massive forest fire that is threatening wildlife in Queensland

After more than a year of devastating forest fires across Queensland, the devastating fire season has ended.

The Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) has released its latest statistics to the media.

It shows that there were 1,521 fires across the state during the 2016/17 fire season.

Of these, there were 3,845 fires that burned over 6,600 hectares (14,900 acres) in the state, which means there were approximately 2,500 hectares (5,500 acres) of forest fire across the province.

The BOM says there were around 13,000 fires in the week before Christmas, which equates to about 14% of all fires in Queensland.

In the past 24 hours alone, Queensland has experienced 17,000 wildfires, which translates to roughly a third of the state’s fires in a single day.

This fire season is one of the worst on record, according to the Bureau of Fire Protection.

In addition, Queensland is also facing one of its driest years on record and the fires have already impacted over 5,000 hectares (16,000 acres) and have destroyed more than 5,400 homes and businesses in the past week alone.

More than 90% of Queensland’s fire suppression efforts have been put on hold for the season, with the Queensland Fire Service (QFS) having to limit fire suppression operations in some areas and restrict access to affected areas for firefighters.

The Queensland Government has warned of “an unprecedented” risk to wildlife in the Queensland floodplains and is planning to make a series of major changes to the area.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has urged residents to remain vigilant, and said she wants to help ensure there is a “safe and secure environment” for all wildlife.

The fires have devastated the Great Barrier Reef, with many animals including whales and seabirds fleeing the fires.

“We’ve had about 4,000 animals leaving,” Queensland’s Chief Inspector Michael Rennie told ABC News Breakfast.

“We’re going to try and bring those animals in here and put them back.

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (RPS) has said it has deployed a new “fishermen’s rescue system” to help save endangered species.RPS said in a statement that it has rescued 3,000 of the estimated 10,000 fish that were in danger of dying from the fires in Boorua and nearby communities.”

I don’t want to do anything that would cause them to abandon their home and get into the water.”

The Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service (RPS) has said it has deployed a new “fishermen’s rescue system” to help save endangered species.RPS said in a statement that it has rescued 3,000 of the estimated 10,000 fish that were in danger of dying from the fires in Boorua and nearby communities.

More to come.